Friday, May 23, 2008

Three paintings by Aniano Henrique

Underwater treasure


A torre da igreja


The future way

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Great images. Look forward to seeing more work. Heart felt and fresh. Thank you Aniano!
Patrick.

Anonymous said...

"A torre da igreja" means "Church tower" right? An anti-clerical image, no doubt! Amateurish and non-surrealist painting, at best. I wonder what made you promote the work of this impostor.

Karel

cut_throat said...

"Amateurish?" Oh dear. The Surrealist movement would be so much safer if we just left the painting to the professionals, eh?

Paul Cowdell said...

Ooh, a visit from the OfSurr inspectorate. We're clearly going to have to assess Outcomes and Strategic Planning. If this goes badly, Tory councillors will move in with their private finance to turn us into an Academy.

Anonymous said...

You did an excellent job at protecting your catholic friend. Congratulations! May he become a second Dali! I will look for surrealism elsewhere.

K.

Pearl Handel said...

This is a good opportunity to clarify our position.

SLAG's policy is to welcome approaches from anyone whose desire to engage with Surrealism is sincere, playful and curious. Some of those people are already fully-formed Surrealists, some are not, but that's not what is most important to us. When such people approach us, we invite them to our open meetings. If, after playing together at an open meeting, we all feel we want to continue on a regular basis, we welcome them into our "closed" meetings (which are occulted, and the results of which do not appear on our blogs). We think that such openness to newcomers, experienced or otherwise, is essential if we want to build a movement and not just preserve a clique.

In Aniano's case, we were all moved by his obvious sincerity and seriousness. We've posted some of his paintings here not to "promote" his work (a concept meaningless to us) but to celebrate this new friendship. Unlike the omniscient K, we don't pretend to know how that friendship will develop in the future. For us, such unpredictability is part of the excitement of the Surrealist adventure.

Anonymous said...

Why not just admit the mistake?

The SLAG corporate body seems to reveal amateurism as its core value. Okay, so what?

Surreal art of a pretty picture of a church with a crucifix on top surrounded by orbs cannot possibly be interpreted as surrealism. Any idiot can see that!! But it had to be pointed out to you...!

Duoh... It's got nothing to do with being "occulted". That's pretentious crap, which of course the SLAG specialises in.

Lowska

Pearl Handel said...

You've conflated two different issues here. Allow us to clarify them for you.

You approve of Karel's having "pointed out" to us that Aniano must be a catholic because he has painted a church. That's a simple-minded defence of a simple-minded assumption. By the same logic, Magritte must have been an optometrist because Painted Object: Eye is, er, a painting of an eye. But even though that argument is clumsy and reductive, it does at least attempt to engage with Surrealism on an ideological plane. Your other argument doesn't even reach that level. To claim that a painting cannot be Surrealist on aesthetic grounds - i.e. because it is "amateurish" and "pretty" - reveals such a basic misunderstanding of Surrealism that "duoh" wouldn't begin to do it justice.

Again, like Karel, you use "amateurism" as if it were a pejorative. Which part of "poetry must be made by all" do you professionals not understand?

Yes, someone here does seem to be mistaken, but it's not Aniano, and it's not the rest of SLAG either.

Anonymous said...

I think that Karel means to say that this painter is amateurish from a surrealist point of view. Also, you did not address the "non-surrealist" objection. Magritte's painting of an eye is a subversive image (need I explain why?). Where is the subversive value of painting a church with orbs? In other words, how does your painter friend advance the cause of surrealism? If "poetry made by all" means crap made by all, then it's not worth the trouble!

(Karel and Lowska, please rejoin the conversation!)

T.M.

cut_throat said...

All three of these paintings are oneiric and hallucinatory images (need I explain why?). And I have literally no idea what the phrase "amateurish from a surrealist point of view" could possibly mean. Contrasting it with its opposite -- "professional from a surrealist point of view" -- simply confirms its meaninglessness.

Anonymous said...

So, all oneiric and hallucinatory images are surrealist?

T.M.

cut_throat said...

Your question whether "all oneiric and hallucinatory images are surrealist" is based on a false premise. There are no fixed criteria by which one might judge whether an image is "really" surrealist independently of the passion, sincerity and commitment with which the dreamer who produced it has plunged into his or her Unconscious. So your question is completely irrelevant. In fact this whole exchange has been one long exercise in failed communication. The things that interest my comrades and I are collective adventure, passion for the Marvellous, and above all poetic experience. Poetic experience may or may not result in paintings or other artefacts, which others may or may not appreciate, but those are entirely secondary to the encounter with the Marvellous which provoked them. I've seen precious little sense of poetry, passion, or appetite for adventure in the comments left here so far; all I've seen is knee-jerk hostility, snobbery, and miserablism.

Anonymous said...

http://anianohenrique.blogspot.com/